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Zoos & Wildlife

Big Bear Wildlife

Big Bear Alpine Zoo

Big Bear Alpine Zoo is the “go to” facility for injured and imprinted animals. Their rehabilitation facility offers injured, orphaned and imprinted wildlife a safe haven, either temporarily while they heal, or permanently if they are unable to survive on their own. One of only two alpine zoos in the United States, a majority of the Zoo's residents are from the San Bernardino Mountains.

Grizzlies at the Zoo

Fast Facts:

  • 90% of the animals brought to the Zoo for rehabilitation are successfully released back into their native environment.
  • Animals that remain at the Zoo are either too injured or have been imprinted by humans and cannot be released back into the wild to care for themselves.
  • In 1959, a forest fire engulfed the San Bernardino National Forest injuring many animals that then required care. A makeshift hospital/rehabilitation facility was set up on land where the Zoo currently resides.
  • The first bald eagle, Stumpy, who lost his leg in a wolf trap, arrived at the zoo in 1986 courtesy of Alaska Airlines. The eagle, scheduled to be euthanized, was saved by a Big Bear resident who worked for the Wrangle Ranger District in Alaska.
  • Friends of the Moonridge Zoo was established in 1989 as a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization. Their mission was to support the Zoo by inspiring understanding, respect, and environmentally responsible action for the conservation of wildlife and habitat through public education, volunteer support, fundraising, development, and financial support.
A bobcat at the Zoo

The Zoo plans to keep evolving their care for their residents - most notably through the building of a new 10.5 acre facility and through evidence based animal management and research.

Both guided and self-guided tours are available and provide a look into mountain wildlife and the delicate ecosystem that sustains them. Every day at noon, animal keepers give an "Animal of the Day" presentation where visitors can learn about the animal’s history, where they come from, what they eat, and how they live in the wild. Behavioral Enrichment presentations throughout the day also allow onlookers to witness how animal keepers encourage the animals' natural behaviors which improves their welfare.

Fast Info:

Address: 43285 Goldmine Drive
Admission: Ages 11+ $12
Seniors (age 60+) $9
Children (ages 3-10) $9
Children (2-) Free
Ticket Prices are subject to change anytime.

Contact: BigBearZoo.org 909-584-1299


Snow Leopard Animal Presentation

Most of Big Bear Alpine Zoo's funding comes directly from admission costs, but there are many different ways you can show your support for this wildlife sanctuary:

Adopt An Animal!

Sponsor one of the zoo's residents for a year! The “adopter” will be mailed a Certificate of Adoption, and additional swag items depending on adoption level.

Donate!

Your donation will support costs of building the new zoo, feeding the animals, construction of exhibits, general operations, medical care for the animals, educational programs and special events. Your donation is 100% tax deductable!

Become A Member!

Enjoy free zoo admission for one year, a subscription to the e-version of Paw Prints Newsletter, and gift shop discounts depending on membership level.

Petting Zoos

Two girls at a petting zoo

Get up close and personal with with goats, pigs, rabbits, alpacas, and more at Baldwin Lake Stables! This fun petting zoo is great for kids and families. Call (909) 585-6482 for rates and additional info.

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